//
archives

Archive for

A Poem About Lee’s Surrender at Appomattox by Mark Walston, Appearing in the Baltimore Review

  Appomattox Surrender 1865   Wandering carnage at twilight General Lee espied General Washington surveying, engorged on war now engaged in discourse melancholy for their commonwealth.   By bodies boating fell talk of pride and valor the price of tobacco the cost of life banquettes and lunettes demi-lunes and barbettes – vive la France – … Continue reading

A Poem About Thomas Jefferson’s Slave Lover by Mark Walston, appearing in the Hidden City Quarterly

  Sally Hemings Sails to Paris 1787   Moldboard plows and polygraphs, scuppernong trellises redolent with a heavy dark sweetness, meticulous celestial observations and a ledger of misbegotten bound in bright leather.   Ardent in the spring arbor liberty desires ripen with iridescent irony – love frees nothing but hatred and enlightened lust leads not … Continue reading

Two Poems About America’s Founding by Mark Walston Appearing in the Boston Review

  Cotton Mather Preaches on Satan Mark Walston   exceedingly disturbed, Territory wrested from a devil exceedingly disturbed, the perceived accomplishment of providential possession of the utmost parts irritating, infuriating, immediately precipitating vile machinations to overturn the godly establishment. The mouth of perdition issues a flood for the carrying away of the ignorant and unrepentant, … Continue reading